Updates on Calestous Juma

Starr Forum: Innovation and Its Enemies
A Book Talk by Calestous Juma
2014-2015 MLK Visiting Professor in the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP)
Professor of the Practice of International Development
Director, Science, Technology, Globalization
Belfer Center for Science and International AffairsWHEN: Thursday, November 17, 2016 | 5-6:30pm CANCELLED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

WHERE: 33 Massachusetts Avenue (MIT 3-270, Maclaurin Building)
Cambridge, MA

Free & open to the public | Refreshments served | Books sold at the event
Can’t attend in person? Watch it on Facebook live or on-demand on YouTube.
For more information or accessibility accommodations please contact starrforum@mit.edu.


Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies (Oxford University Press, 2016) by Calestous Juma shows that many debates over new technologies are framed in the context of risks to moral values, human health, and environmental safety. But it argues that behind these legitimate concerns often lie deeper, but unacknowledged, socioeconomic considerations.

The book explains the roots of resistance to new technologies and why such resistance is not always futile. Juma draws from nearly 600 years of economic history to show how the balance of winners and losers shapes technological controversies. He outlines policy strategies for inclusive innovation to reduce the risks and maximize the benefits of new technologies.

Using detailed case studies of coffee, the printing press, margarine, farm mechanization, electricity, mechanical refrigeration, recorded music, transgenic crops, and transgenic animals, Juma shows how new technologies emerge, take root, and create new institutional ecologies that favor their establishment in the marketplace. He uses these lessons from history to contextualize contemporary debates surrounding technologies such as artificial intelligence, online learning, 3D printing, gene editing, robotics, drones, and renewable energy.

Innovation and Its Enemies ultimately makes the case for shifting greater responsibility to public leaders to work with scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs to manage technological change, make associated institutional adjustments, and expand public engagement on scientific and technological matters.

“[An] outstanding treatise on how new technologies are created and why they are so often not initially accepted by society,” says Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT. “I loved reading it.”

The MIT Center for International Studies (CIS) Starr Forum is a public event series sponsored by the Starr Foundation of New York. It brings to the MIT campus leading academics, policymakers and journalists to discuss pressing issues in the world of international relations and U.S. foreign policy. CIS Starr Forums are open to the general public as well as to the MIT community.

To contact the CIS Starr Forum, please e-mail starrforum@mit.edu.


Innovation and Its Enemies can be ordered at www.oup.com/academic with promo code ASFLYQ6 to save (see flyer).

Table of Contents:

juma-innovation-bookAcknowledgements

Introduction

1. Gales of Creative Destruction
2. Brewing Trouble: Coffee
3. Stop the Presses: Printing the Koran
4. Smear Campaigns: Margarine
5. Gaining Traction: Farm Mechanization
6. Charged Arguments: Electricity
7. Cool Reception: Mechanical Refrigeration
8. Facing the Music: Recorded Sound
9. Taking Root: Transgenic Crops
10. Swimming against the Current: AquAdvantage Salmon
11. Oiling the Wheels of Novelty

Notes

References

Index

Calestous Juma‘s new book bears a compelling cover image: a modern lightbulb shattering a traditional one from within.

Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies, forthcoming in July 2016 by Oxford University Press, shows that many debates over new technologies are framed in the context of risks to moral values, human health, and environmental safety. But it argues that behind these legitimate concerns often lie deeper, but unacknowledged, socioeconomic considerations.

The book explains the roots of resistance to new technologies and why such resistance is not always futile. Juma draws from nearly 600 years of economic history to show how the balance of winners and losers shapes technological controversies. He outlines policy strategies for inclusive innovation to reduce the risks and maximize the benefits of new technologies.

Using detailed case studies of coffee, the printing press, margarine, farm mechanization, electricity, mechanical refrigeration, recorded music, transgenic crops, and transgenic animals, Juma shows how new technologies emerge, take root, and create new institutional ecologies that favor their establishment in the marketplace. He uses these lessons from history to contextualize contemporary debates surrounding technologies such as artificial intelligence, online learning, 3D printing, gene editing, robotics, drones, and renewable energy.

Innovation and Its Enemies ultimately makes the case for shifting greater responsibility to public leaders to work with scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs to manage technological change, make associated institutional adjustments, and expand public engagement on scientific and technological matters.

“[An] outstanding treatise on how new technologies are created and why they are so often not initially accepted by society,” says Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT. “I loved reading it.”

Calestous Juma is Professor of the Practice of International Development and Director of Science, Technology, Globalization, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University. He was a 2014-2015 Visiting Professor in the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP).



This book will be available in July 2016. It can be preordered through Oxford University Press. Order online at www.oup.com/academic with promo code ASFLYQ6 to save (see flyer).

Table of Contents:

juma-innovation-bookAcknowledgements

Introduction

1. Gales of Creative Destruction
2. Brewing Trouble: Coffee
3. Stop the Presses: Printing the Koran
4. Smear Campaigns: Margarine
5. Gaining Traction: Farm Mechanization
6. Charged Arguments: Electricity
7. Cool Reception: Mechanical Refrigeration
8. Facing the Music: Recorded Sound
9. Taking Root: Transgenic Crops
10. Swimming against the Current: AquAdvantage Salmon
11. Oiling the Wheels of Novelty

Notes

References

Index

MLK 2014-2015 Visiting Professors & Scholars Farewell Luncheon
Friday, June 12, 2015
Noon-1:30pm
MIT Chipman Room (6-104)

Please contact Shauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu to RSVP

The Institute Community and Equity Officer (ICEO) is proud to host a farewell luncheon to celebrate the accomplishments of MIT’s seven 2014-15 Dr. Martin Luther, Jr. Visiting Professors and Scholars. The MLK Faculty Committee, partners/friends of the program, department heads and sponsors will be in attendance.

From awards and lectures to research and publications, this year’s seven visiting scholars have had quite an active year at the Institute.  See past posts on our News+Events page for a review of how they have enriched the intellectual life of MIT.

Certificates of distinction will be presented to:

Coco Fusco, Visiting Scholar, Comparative Media Studies/Writing

Malika Jeffries-EL, Visiting Associate Professor, Chemistry

Calestous Juma, Visiting Professor, Urban Studies and Planning

James Mickens, Visiting Scholar, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Hakeem Oluseyi, Visiting Professor, Physics

André D. Taylor, Visiting Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Kimani C. Toussaint, Visiting Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Calestous Juma: Africa rebooting

Calestous Juma‘s latest opinion piece in the April 2015 issue of NewAfrican Magazine:

We all know Africa is a continent full of innovation. Now policy makers at all levels must put this strength, along with scientific and technical development, at the centre of economic strategies. Fortunately, the African Union has recently adopted a strategy that seeks to do exactly that.

“The 10-year Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa (STISA-2024) recently adopted by the African Union (AU) embodies this vision. Its mission is to “accelerate Africa’s transition to an innovation-led, knowledge-based economy.” The strategy is part of the longer-term Agenda 2063 – the AU’s development vision and action plan.”

READ MORE

STARR FORUM: SCIENCE & INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY
Thursday, April 09, 2015  6:00 pm–7:30 pm
MIT Room 54-100, Green Building
Free and open to the public
For more information and to RSVP, please contact starrforum@mit.edu.

 

Calestous Juma will moderate a Starr Forum panel on Science & Innovation Diplomacy, with welcoming remarks by Professor Fiona Murray, Faculty Director at the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship and the Legatum Center. The event is organized by the Center for International Studies, the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and the MIT Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Visiting Professors and Scholars Program.Speakers: 

Phil Budden, Senior Lecturer at MIT Sloan, affiliated with the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship and the TIES Group.

Nina Fedoroff, The Evan Pugh Professor at Pennsylvania State University and former Science and Technology Advisor to the US Secretary of State.

Kenneth Oye, joint appointee at MIT in Political Science and Engineering Systems, with research and teaching on international relations, political economy and technology policy.

 

VIEW POSTER
Livestream URL: http://webcast.amps.ms.mit.edu/spr2015/Starr_Forum/09apr/

 

Among the judges for this year’s Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering was Calestous Juma (pictured with Brian Cox, fellow panelist and professor at University of Manchester ). The Queen Elizabeth Prize, designed to become a “Nobel” for engineering, was set up with cross-party backing and industry support to celebrate innovators with global impact.

The verdict is in: Professor Robert Langer of MIT has won the £1m award for his development of drug-release systems, tissue building and microchip implants.

READ MORE

Calestous Juma on how Nigeria defeated ebola

Calestous Juma‘s latest article in The Guardian observes that the key to Nigeria’s successful containment of ebola is the strength of the public sector: state governments, universities and hospitals.

“A brief look at the news suggests African countries aren’t stepping up their support to the affected countries,” writes Juma. “This view, however, ignores three important lessons from Africa’s response to the outbreak.”

READ MORE

Do you have questions about Africa that you want answered or are just curious about the continent? The “Ask Me Anything” series of events provides first-hand personal perspectives on diversity issues. We encourage faculty members, staff, and students to attend these events to learn more about the issues and about how to be effective allies and leaders, both within the MIT community and beyond. Sponsored by Africa Business Club, SWIM Breaking The Mold, and the Student Life Office.

Food will be served, please RSVP here.


Confirmed panelists include:Prof. Calestous Juma  – Panelist
MIT MLK Visiting Professor from Harvard Kennedy School
Professor of the Practice of International Development and Director of the Science, Technology, and Globalization Project
WebsiteProf. Simon Johnson – Moderator
Professor of Entrepreneurship and of Global Economics Management at MIT Sloan
Website

Tuoyo Ebigbeyi – Panelist
MBA 2016

David Machingaidze – Panelist
Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership

Perihan Abou-Zeid – Panelist
MBA 2015

You’re Invited: MLK Lunch Seminars

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Visiting Professors and Scholars welcomed its newest cohort with a luncheon on Wednesday, September 24 at the Sloan School. You are cordially invited to attend our ongoing MLK Luncheon Seminar Series featuring talks by the 2014-2015 Scholars and other speakers. We look forward to you joining us!

Please contact Shauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu or 617-715-2066 to RSVP and note any dietary restrictions.

UPCOMING

OCTOBER 22, 2014
Freedom to Innovate: Science, Technology and Engineering in African Development
Dr. Calestous Juma
12:00 PM- 1:30 PM
​MIT E62-350

[view flyer]

MIT News Q&A with Calestous Juma

How can Africa find new ways to spark economic growth? That was the focus of “Africa Rebooted,” a wide-ranging public symposium hosted by the Center for International Studies moderated by Calestous Juma on Sept. 24 at the Whitehead Institute.

MIT News: You have worked with the African Union as a high-level advisor to develop its new 10-year Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa, which is a focal point of tomorrow’s Starr Forum symposium. What are some of the distinctive features of this roadmap, regarding the contemporary challenges of growth across the continent?

Juma. The key distinctive feature of the strategy is the recognition that Africa cannot sustain economic growth and promote prosperity without significant investments in technological innovation…READ MORE