Because nurses are at the forefront of patient interactions, it seems only fitting that nurse scientists lead the charge in genomic research that can be translated from the bench to bedside and be the agent for change in health policy related to genomic screening recommendations worldwide. –Jacquelyn Taylor

Jacquelyn Taylor and her colleagues have published “Genome Sequencing Technologies and Nursing: What are the Roles of Nurses and Nurse Scientists? in Nursing Research, the top research journal for nurse scientists.

From feature in the Yale School of Nursing webpage (6 March 2017):

Yale School of Nursing’s Jacquelyn Taylor PhD, PNP-BC, RN, FAHA, FAAN serves as the guest editor for the March issue of Nursing Research’s special issue on Omics. It is in that capacity that Taylor, herself an award-winning genomics researcher, offered the above thesis in a commentary about the future of genomics and precision health and, specifically, the important role that nurse scientist and nurse clinicians have in the rapidly evolving healthcare environment.

According to Taylor, who penned the commentary along with colleagues from Emory University, Columbia University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, genomic sequencing is quickly becoming a routine standard of care.

READ MORE

 

 

From “Ta-Nehisi Coates on Creating Black Superheroes,” The New York Times (2 March 2017):

When Marvel Comics announced in September 2015 that Ta-Nehisi Coates would be writing a new Black Panther series, the timing could not have been more fortuitous. That same month, Mr. Coates, who writes regularly for The Atlantic, was awarded a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation “genius grant,” and, two months later, a National Book Award for nonfiction for Between the World and Me, his passionate letter to his son about being black in America.

The momentum for the hero was also tremendous. Issue No. 1 of Black Panther hit stores last April and went on to sell more than 300,000 copies, according to Marvel. He then made his big screen debut in May, with “Captain America: Civil War,” and was played by Chadwick Boseman, who will reprise the role in a solo film next year. In July came Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, a collected edition of the first four issues of the comic. It was followed, in November, by World of Wakanda, a companion series in which Mr. Coates introduced two more newcomers to the roster of comic-book scribes: the feminist writer Roxane Gay and the poet Yona Harvey. This April comes a new series, Black Panther and the Crew, a team comprising only black heroes, written by Mr. Coates and Ms. Harvey.

Mr. Coates answered questions about the success of Black Panther, his approach to writing, the members of the Crew and what’s next.

READ MORE

Julius L. Chambers (1936–2013) delivered the keynote for the 1996 22nd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration, themed “With Liberty and Justice for All”. At the time, Chambers was Chancellor of North Carolina Central University and Former Director of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

In Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights (The University of North Carolina Press), Richard A. Rosen and Joseph Mosnier connect the details of Chambers’s life to the wider struggle to secure racial equality through the development of modern civil rights law. Tracing his path from a dilapidated black elementary school to counsel’s lectern at the Supreme Court and beyond, they reveal Chambers’s singular influence on the evolution of federal civil rights law after 1964.

Born in the hamlet of Mount Gilead, North Carolina, Chambers escaped the fetters of the Jim Crow South to emerge in the 1960s and 1970s as the nation’s leading African American civil rights attorney. Following passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Chambers worked to advance the NAACP Legal Defense Fund’s strategic litigation campaign for civil rights, ultimately winning landmark school and employment desegregation cases at the U.S. Supreme Court. Undaunted by the dynamiting of his home and the arson that destroyed the offices of his small integrated law practice, Chambers pushed federal civil rights law to its highwater mark.

READ MORE


julius-chambers-book

 

 

Starr Forum: Innovation and Its Enemies
A Book Talk by Calestous Juma
2014-2015 MLK Visiting Professor in the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP)
Professor of the Practice of International Development
Director, Science, Technology, Globalization
Belfer Center for Science and International AffairsWHEN: Thursday, November 17, 2016 | 5-6:30pm CANCELLED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

WHERE: 33 Massachusetts Avenue (MIT 3-270, Maclaurin Building)
Cambridge, MA

Free & open to the public | Refreshments served | Books sold at the event
Can’t attend in person? Watch it on Facebook live or on-demand on YouTube.
For more information or accessibility accommodations please contact starrforum@mit.edu.


Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies (Oxford University Press, 2016) by Calestous Juma shows that many debates over new technologies are framed in the context of risks to moral values, human health, and environmental safety. But it argues that behind these legitimate concerns often lie deeper, but unacknowledged, socioeconomic considerations.

The book explains the roots of resistance to new technologies and why such resistance is not always futile. Juma draws from nearly 600 years of economic history to show how the balance of winners and losers shapes technological controversies. He outlines policy strategies for inclusive innovation to reduce the risks and maximize the benefits of new technologies.

Using detailed case studies of coffee, the printing press, margarine, farm mechanization, electricity, mechanical refrigeration, recorded music, transgenic crops, and transgenic animals, Juma shows how new technologies emerge, take root, and create new institutional ecologies that favor their establishment in the marketplace. He uses these lessons from history to contextualize contemporary debates surrounding technologies such as artificial intelligence, online learning, 3D printing, gene editing, robotics, drones, and renewable energy.

Innovation and Its Enemies ultimately makes the case for shifting greater responsibility to public leaders to work with scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs to manage technological change, make associated institutional adjustments, and expand public engagement on scientific and technological matters.

“[An] outstanding treatise on how new technologies are created and why they are so often not initially accepted by society,” says Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT. “I loved reading it.”

The MIT Center for International Studies (CIS) Starr Forum is a public event series sponsored by the Starr Foundation of New York. It brings to the MIT campus leading academics, policymakers and journalists to discuss pressing issues in the world of international relations and U.S. foreign policy. CIS Starr Forums are open to the general public as well as to the MIT community.

To contact the CIS Starr Forum, please e-mail starrforum@mit.edu.


Innovation and Its Enemies can be ordered at www.oup.com/academic with promo code ASFLYQ6 to save (see flyer).

Table of Contents:

juma-innovation-bookAcknowledgements

Introduction

1. Gales of Creative Destruction
2. Brewing Trouble: Coffee
3. Stop the Presses: Printing the Koran
4. Smear Campaigns: Margarine
5. Gaining Traction: Farm Mechanization
6. Charged Arguments: Electricity
7. Cool Reception: Mechanical Refrigeration
8. Facing the Music: Recorded Sound
9. Taking Root: Transgenic Crops
10. Swimming against the Current: AquAdvantage Salmon
11. Oiling the Wheels of Novelty

Notes

References

Index

Rasheed Auguste is a member of the MIT Class of 2017 and a 2016 MLK Leadership Awardee. A double major in Nuclear Science and Engineering and Physics, Rasheed is a nuclear materials undergraduate researcher, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Rho Nu Chapter, and a brother of the Chocolate City living group on campus. Auguste’s recent post about his experience as an activist on campus appears on BAMIT Review (28 July 2016), the Black Alumni/ae of MIT (BAMIT) blog.


Reflections of a BSU Co-Chair

A Voyage Toward Diversity and Inclusion at MIT
By Rasheed Auguste ’17

How will you know when it’s finished . . . What will MIT look like?

— Professor Wes Harris

Seemingly every previous Black Students’ Union (BSU) Co-Chair has advanced at least one major innovation during his or her tenure. Ikenna Enware ’15 helped launch an annual Black pre-frosh ‘fly-in’ weekend for Ebony Affair, the Black MIT community’s flagship gala. Last year, Grace Assaye ’16 led the MIT undergraduate community’s response to police brutality and systemic racism through Black Lives Matter.

I, however, had no idea what my contribution would be when I stepped into the role of BSU Co-Chair during my junior year. And then, we witnessed a wave of events ripple across college campuses around the country — places like the University of Missouri, Yale University, and Ithaca College — that demanded collective action.

For the first time, I felt exposed. Social media posts by my personal friends now mirrored national news headlines. This wave had hit a bit too close to home. My MIT bubble had burst, and the real world came crashing in.

READ MORE

 

Dr. Jacquelyn Taylor and her colleagues at Yale have written the following op-ed for The Huffington Post (12 July 2016) addressing the ongoing murders of black men by police.

The Power To Serve, The Imperative To Protect: A Letter To Police From Nurses

We know that police put themselves in harm’s way when they don the badge, and some have lain down their lives in the service of protecting society; there is no greater gift.  We saw this when police in Dallas ran toward the shooting and pushed protesters out of the path of gunfire.  As nurses, we see their courage and care when the escort the injured and sick into our emergency rooms.  Yet there is no denying that we are in the midst of a public health crisis that demands a response, including from nurses. Black men are being slain. In the first six months of 2016 alone, nearly 500 people, mostly men of color, have been fatally shot by police. The violence of the killings, now often caught on mobile video cams, shock human decency; they spawn reactive and brutal killings by people who feel hopeless and without recourse.

The public has rated nursing as the most trusted profession year after year, because the public knows that nurses care for the health of all people, regardless of sex, race, age, disease, or other characteristics. Nurses are ethical in their delivery of service, caring for people even when this may imperil our own lives, such as nurses who care for people with Ebola and other communicable diseases.  A public health nursing intervention focused on this epidemic would be for police to be trained to approach black men as nurses approach their patients – as people, not black or white people, young or old, rich or poor.  Most important, police must see black men not as people whom we need to protect ourselves from, but as people who need our care, our protection, our service.

We understand that the police profession involves danger, but as nurses, and nurses of color, we can no longer be silent witnesses to this epidemic. We call upon Congress and state legislatures to provide the funding for training so that all in the law enforcement profession can be equipped to protect and serve all the public equitably and fairly.  Police are in a privileged position of power, just as nurses are, at patients’ bedsides. As one group of professionals dedicated to serving to another, we urge police to use their power to promote equal protection and not more inequality.

Everol Ennis, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, MSN, Yale School of Nursing ‘09
Jacquelyn Taylor, Associate Professor of Nursing, Assistant Dean for Diversity, Yale School of Nursing
Ann Kurth, Dean, Yale School of Nursing
Mark Lazenby, Associate Professor of Nursing, Yale School of Nursing, and author of the forthcoming Caring Matters Most (Oxford University Press)

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates has scripted Marvel Comics’ Black Panther. Issue #3 of 11 was released on June 30, 2016, with illustrations by artist Brian Stelfreeze.

Black Panther follows an African king named T’Challa with superhuman strength and intellect, who presides over the fictional nation of Wakanda. Black Panther was first launched in 1966, just a few months before the Black Panther political party came on the scene (Coates himself is the son of Paul Coates, a former member of the Black Panther Party). But over the years, T’Challa has pretty much played second fiddle to the likes of Daredevil and Captain America. And his storylines often revolve around divided loyalties.

In Issue #3, the Midnight Angels continue the liberation of Wakanda with extreme prejudice, and T’Challa’s indecisions could cost him more than just the throne. The issue includes a few introductory words on writers Toni Morrison, Joel Dias-Porter, Eugene Redmond, and Henry Dumas. In a behind-the-scenes blog for The Atlantic, Coates writes about being stunned by Henry Dumas’ poem “Rootsong” for its use of “black myth to construct a narrative of the diaspora before and after colonialism and enslavement.”

READ COATES’ BEHIND-THE-SCENES IN THE ATLANTIC


Video preview of Black Panther Issue #3

 

Dr. Jacquelyn Taylor is lead author of a recent study published in npj Genomic Medicine, a Nature Publication journal, titled “Lead toxicity and genetics in Flint, MI.” Dr. Taylor and co-authors Michelle Wright and David Housman highlight the interaction of genetics and lead toxicity, specifically among children of African descent, in relation to the Flint, MI lead poisoning crisis. A call to immediate action, the article urges precision genetic-testing as a more effective approach than the current methods being used to assess lead levels in the children exposed to lead-contaminated drinking water in Flint, MI.

READ MORE


In May 2016, npj Genomic Medicine published another article by the same authors titled “A perspective for sequencing familial hypercholesterolaemia in African Americans.” The paper recommends evaluating genetic variation within minority populations to identify factors that contribute to disparities in cardiovascular health.

READ MORE

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates has scripted Marvel Comics’ Black Panther. Issue #2 of 11 was released on May 11, 2016, with illustrations by artist Brian Stelfreeze.

Black Panther follows an African king named T’Challa with superhuman strength and intellect, who presides over the fictional nation of Wakanda. Black Panther was first launched in 1966, just a few months before the Black Panther political party came on the scene (Coates himself is the son of Paul Coates, a former member of the Black Panther Party). But over the years, T’Challa has pretty much played second fiddle to the likes of Daredevil and Captain America. And his storylines often revolve around divided loyalties.

“This is the dude I wanted to read when I was ten,” says Coates on social media. “He didn’t exist (in his own stand-alone) and so we make do. My hope is some kid is reading this now (maybe one of my nieces or nephews) and feeling it, and seeing themselves.”

READ COATES’ BEHIND-THE-SCENES IN THE ATLANTIC

 

Sample pages from Black Panther, Issue #2

 

Black-Panther-issue2-COVBlack-Panther-issue2

 

 

Calestous Juma‘s new book bears a compelling cover image: a modern lightbulb shattering a traditional one from within.

Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies, forthcoming in July 2016 by Oxford University Press, shows that many debates over new technologies are framed in the context of risks to moral values, human health, and environmental safety. But it argues that behind these legitimate concerns often lie deeper, but unacknowledged, socioeconomic considerations.

The book explains the roots of resistance to new technologies and why such resistance is not always futile. Juma draws from nearly 600 years of economic history to show how the balance of winners and losers shapes technological controversies. He outlines policy strategies for inclusive innovation to reduce the risks and maximize the benefits of new technologies.

Using detailed case studies of coffee, the printing press, margarine, farm mechanization, electricity, mechanical refrigeration, recorded music, transgenic crops, and transgenic animals, Juma shows how new technologies emerge, take root, and create new institutional ecologies that favor their establishment in the marketplace. He uses these lessons from history to contextualize contemporary debates surrounding technologies such as artificial intelligence, online learning, 3D printing, gene editing, robotics, drones, and renewable energy.

Innovation and Its Enemies ultimately makes the case for shifting greater responsibility to public leaders to work with scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs to manage technological change, make associated institutional adjustments, and expand public engagement on scientific and technological matters.

“[An] outstanding treatise on how new technologies are created and why they are so often not initially accepted by society,” says Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT. “I loved reading it.”

Calestous Juma is Professor of the Practice of International Development and Director of Science, Technology, Globalization, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University. He was a 2014-2015 Visiting Professor in the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP).



This book will be available in July 2016. It can be preordered through Oxford University Press. Order online at www.oup.com/academic with promo code ASFLYQ6 to save (see flyer).

Table of Contents:

juma-innovation-bookAcknowledgements

Introduction

1. Gales of Creative Destruction
2. Brewing Trouble: Coffee
3. Stop the Presses: Printing the Koran
4. Smear Campaigns: Margarine
5. Gaining Traction: Farm Mechanization
6. Charged Arguments: Electricity
7. Cool Reception: Mechanical Refrigeration
8. Facing the Music: Recorded Sound
9. Taking Root: Transgenic Crops
10. Swimming against the Current: AquAdvantage Salmon
11. Oiling the Wheels of Novelty

Notes

References

Index