On Sunday, September 15, 1963–just a month after Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.–four Klansmen bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The church had served as a meeting place for civil rights leaders. Four young girls were killed, many other people injured. Over half a

Thomas H. Epps III (MIT ’98, MS ’99) received the 2015 Owens-Corning Early Career Award from the Materials Engineering and Science Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. The award recognizes outstanding independent contributions to the scientific, technological, educational, or service areas of materials science and engineering by people who are under the age

Adriane Brown (MIT SM ’91) was eight years old in 1966, when she and her brother integrated a previously all-white school in Virginia. By sixth grade, she was class president. She’s been a leader ever since, in the corporate world and, most recently, in developing an intellectual property marketplace. This year, MIT recognized her professional and

Ainissa Ramirez‘s latest piece in the May 2015 issue of Science (Vol. 348, No. 6235):    “I have wanted to be a scientist ever since I was a little girl. I got the idea from a television program called 3-2-1 Contact, where I watched a young African-American girl solve problems. I saw my reflection in her and was transfixed. As

Calestous Juma: Africa rebooting

Calestous Juma‘s latest opinion piece in the April 2015 issue of NewAfrican Magazine: We all know Africa is a continent full of innovation. Now policy makers at all levels must put this strength, along with scientific and technical development, at the centre of economic strategies. Fortunately, the African Union has recently adopted a strategy that seeks to

Kimani Toussaint led research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign that demonstrates the first-ever recording of optically encoded audio onto a non-magnetic plasmonic nanostructure, opening the door to multiple uses in informational processing and archival storage. To demonstrate its abilities to store sound and audio files, Toussaint and fellow researchers created a musical keyboard or “nano piano,” using the

Among the judges for this year’s Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering was Calestous Juma (pictured with Brian Cox, fellow panelist and professor at University of Manchester ). The Queen Elizabeth Prize, designed to become a “Nobel” for engineering, was set up with cross-party backing and industry support to celebrate innovators with global impact. The verdict is in: Professor

Kimani C. Toussaint, Jr. has won the College of Engineering Dean’s Award for Excellence in Research for his exceptional research accomplishments in the last five years. The award will be presented at the Engineering Faculty Awards Ceremony on April 27, 2015. READ MORE

In connection with Martin Luther King Jr. Day, James Mickens opted to participate in a Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA) in hopes of answering this question: What is it like to be a person of color in technology and computer science? “DISCLAIMER,” he writes, “I am not an official spokesperson for MIT, Microsoft, or any other noun besides James

Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Diego Chowell, Sri Krishna, Xiangguo Qiu, and Karen S. Anderson report that the effect of early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic infections is strongly dependent on the effectiveness of isolation of infectious individuals in health-care settings: “Our results suggest that a strategy that focuses on early diagnosis of high-risk individuals, caregivers, and health-care workers at the pre-symptomatic stage, when combined