Ta-Nehisi Coates: National Book Award Winner

Thursday, 19 November 2015 by

Ta-Nehisi Coates‘ Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau/Penguin Random House) took home the 2015 National Book Award in Nonfiction. Established in 1950, the National Book Award is an American literary prize administered by the National Book Foundation, a nonprofit organization, in the categories of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature. Winners of the 66th National Book Award

Chanda Hsu Prescod-Weinstein and colleagues have just published “Do dark matter axions form a condensate with long-range correlation?” The paper appears as an “Editors’ Suggestion” in the November 15 issue of Physical Review D (Vol. 92, Iss. 10). READ MORE   Abstract Recently there has been significant interest in the claim that dark matter axions gravitationally

Baratunde Cola: 40 Under 40 Award

Friday, 13 November 2015 by

Baratunde Cola was among Atlanta Business Chronicle’s 40 Under 40 Awardees. From the Atlanta Business Chronicle (6 Nov 2015): About 400 people turned out for the annual awards event Thursday night in the Fox’s Egyptian Ballroom. A dusting of star power fell on the audience when honoree and Atlanta native Christoper “Ludacris” Bridges stepped to the stage, and Master of

Ta-Nehisi Coates: Multiple honors

Friday, 16 October 2015 by

Ta-Nehisi Coates is having a stellar year after the publication of Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau/Penguin Random House, 2015). Visit these links to read each section: Kirkus Prize, Winner MacArthur “Genius” Grant, Winner National Book Award for Nonfiction, Finalist Kirkus Prize Coates was honored with the Kirkus Prize in nonfiction at a ceremony in Austin, TX on October 15, 2015. This year’s judges praised Between

Carlos Castillo-Chavez: Keynote at B.E.E.R.

Thursday, 01 October 2015 by

Carlos Castillo-Chávez will headline International Symposium on Biomathematics and Ecology Education Research. Known as B.E.E.R., the symposium draws in some of the top names in the emerging field of biomathematics. This year, it will take place at Illinois State University from October 9 to 11, 2015. Castillo-Chavez’s work uses both mathematical models and an understanding of ecology to explore the spread of diseases. “Biomathematics

Baratunde Cola and his research team use nanometer-scale components to demonstrate the first optical rectenna, a device that combines the functions of an antenna and a rectifier diode to convert light directly into DC current. Based on multiwall carbon nanotubes and tiny rectifiers fabricated onto them, the optical rectennas could provide a new technology for photodetectors that would operate without

Sylvester Gates, Jr. will receive an honorary doctor of science degree from Memorial University in Canada. The honorary doctorate recognizes extraordinary contributions to society and exceptional intellectual achievement. The two other honorees are retired Supreme Court Justice and former member of the House of Assembly Robert Wells (honorary doctor of laws degree) and actor Robert Joy (honorary doctor of letters). The

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein stands with Ahmed

Thursday, 17 September 2015 by

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein offers words of encouragement to 14-year-old budding engineer Ahmed Mohamed. The Muslim ninth-grader has been in the media spotlight since being arrested on September 14, 2015 at MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas for bringing in a homemade clock. Ahmed says he’d built the device in the hopes of impressing his teachers. He was eventually arrested by police

News From Brown, September 2015:  Christopher Rose will continue his work in communications theory. As associate dean of the Brown University faculty, he will cobble together multidisciplinary faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate student teams by building on what he sees as the unusual technical breadth of underrepresented minorities in STEM disciplines. Christopher Rose has a rather broad

Ainissa Ramirez and her work were featured on a segment of NPR’s “All Things Considered”:  This Teacher Wants To Excite Your Inner Scientist Imagine a space shuttle speeding toward Earth at 17,500 miles per hour, the friction outside heating the vessel up to more than 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit as it enters the atmosphere. Those kind of temperatures

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