Malika Jeffries-EL presents “Designing Materials for High-Tech Applications” at the MIT MLK LUNCHEON SEMINAR.

Wednesday, April 15th  12 – 1:30 pm, location MIT Spofford Room (1-236)

Refreshments will be served before the seminar.
Please contact Shauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu to RSVP.

 

Designing Materials for High-Tech Applications

Since their discovery almost 40 years ago conjugated polymers have been of tremendous scientific and technological interest due to their semiconductor properties. As a result they are well suited for organic use in applications, such as solar cells and light emitting diodes. Unfortunately, there are several issues that have to be addressed before real-life commercialized products based on these materials can be developed. Since the properties of organic semiconductors can be readily modified through chemical synthesis, we have turned our attention towards the design and synthesis of novel building blocks. Our system of choice, polybenzobisazoles posses many exceptional electronic, optical and thermal properties and thus are ideally suited for diverse organic semiconducting applications. However, these materials have found limited utility due their lack of solubility in organic solvents and the harsh conditions required for their synthesis. Using theoretical models, our group designed a series tunable materials, our recent developments in this area will be presented.

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Third Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. – Inspired Art Contest and Performance

Win cash prizes up to $250.00 each!

 

SUBMISSION DEADLINEFriday, April 24, 2015 (11:59 pm EST)
Contest open to all MIT undergraduate and graduate students as well as Wellesley students cross-registered at MIT.
REGISTER HERE: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1cUbmdv6YKvRmpgIqm5bx
CONTEST/PERFORMANCE DATEThursday, April 30, 6:30-8:30 pm, Wong Auditorium
Dinner served and artwork displayed in the Ting Foyer (MIT E51). Performances begin at 7:15 pm in the Wong Auditorium.Are you inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr or other civil rights leaders such as Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Cesar Chavez, Fannie Lou Hamer and Harvey Milk?

Express yourself by entering:

  • visual art (painting, photography, sculpture, video)
  • performance art (music, song, spoken word, dance, theater)
  • literary work (poetry, short story, speech, play)
Entries should be related to or inspired by any of the ideals of Dr. King and/or other civil rights leaders in the past or current human rights activists in the US and the World. These ideals include freedom, justice, peace, equality, civil rights, human rights and/or social justice.
Here is your chance to show off your creativity and artistic skills to the MIT community, have fun and win money!

Hakeem Oluseyi presents “Star Hacking: Finding the Next Earth and Getting There” at the MIT MLK LUNCHEON SEMINAR.

Wednesday, April 8th  12 – 1:30 pm, location: MIT Bush Room, 10-105

Refreshments will be served before the seminar.
Please contact Shauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu to RSVP.

 

Star Hacking: Finding the Next Earth and Getting There

The newest definition of the verb “hack” involves modifying something or using it other than its intended purpose in order to cleverly solve a tricky problem. It is now common in astrophysics to hack stars in order to further human understanding of the universe. We can use stars to discover new planets, to address the structure and evolution of the Galaxy, or even to develop new technologies. In this talk, I will describe my work “star hacking” at MIT this year as an MLK Faculty Fellow. Two main projects are being undertaken. The first is a collaboration with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) science team to discover new Earth-like planets around nearby stars. TESS will also observe and discover a large number of variable stars, which may be used to elucidate Galactic structure and evolution. I will also describe a novel magnetic reconnection based, ion drive in-space propulsion technology that my group has invented, which was inspired by plasma acceleration at the Sun’s surface.

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STARR FORUM: SCIENCE & INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY
Thursday, April 09, 2015  6:00 pm–7:30 pm
MIT Room 54-100, Green Building
Free and open to the public
For more information and to RSVP, please contact starrforum@mit.edu.

 

Calestous Juma will moderate a Starr Forum panel on Science & Innovation Diplomacy, with welcoming remarks by Professor Fiona Murray, Faculty Director at the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship and the Legatum Center. The event is organized by the Center for International Studies, the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and the MIT Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Visiting Professors and Scholars Program.Speakers: 

Phil Budden, Senior Lecturer at MIT Sloan, affiliated with the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship and the TIES Group.

Nina Fedoroff, The Evan Pugh Professor at Pennsylvania State University and former Science and Technology Advisor to the US Secretary of State.

Kenneth Oye, joint appointee at MIT in Political Science and Engineering Systems, with research and teaching on international relations, political economy and technology policy.

 

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Livestream URL: http://webcast.amps.ms.mit.edu/spr2015/Starr_Forum/09apr/

 

André D. Taylor presents “Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage Devices using Nanostructured Materials” at the MIT Department of Chemical Engineering Spring 2015 Seminar Series.

Friday, March 20, 2015 at 3:00 pm
Reception at 2:45 pm
Location: 66-110

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Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage Devices using Nanostructured Materials

One of the key challenges facing the widespread use and commercialization of promising energy devices (i.e. fuel cells, batteries, organic solar cells etc.) is the high cost of the electrocatalytic and electrolyte materials and inefficiencies in their assembly and utilization.  In this talk, I will present three examples of how we are designing nanomaterials such as graphene-based carbons and bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys that can be incorporated into multifunctional composites for high performance nanostructured-enabled energy devices.
1) Spin Spray Layer-by-Layer (SSLBL) Assembly. We have developed a fully automated SSLBL system with deposition at sub-second cycle times allowing nano-level control over film growth and efficient formation of a conducting network not available with other solution based deposition methods for lithium ion battery electrodes. This platform technology can be used to create many other systems (i.e. specialty coatings, drug delivery, etc.)
2) Electrocatalysts. We will describe a new class of materials, Pt58Cu15Ni5P22 bulk metallic glass that can circumvent Pt-based anode poisoning and agglomeration/dissolution typically associated with supported catalysts during long-term operation in fuel cells. These amorphous metal alloys can serve as an interesting platform for next-generation catalysts and devices such as the first all bulk metallic glass micro fuel cell.
3) Network Electrodes (See Fig.). Here we describe a technique for developing freestanding multifunctional SWNT composite thin films that provides a fundamental engineering basis to bridge the gap between their nano and macroscale properties forsolar cell transparent conductive electrodes. We will also describe recent efforts in using these films as active layers in hybrid SWNT/Si solar cell device as well as the use of Förster resonance energy transfer for high efficiency small molecule and polymer solar cells.

André D. Taylor presents “Using Nanostructured Materials for Solar Energy Storage in Haiti” at the MIT MLK LUNCHEON SEMINAR.

Wednesday, April 1st  12 – 1:30 pm, location MIT Chipman Room (6-104)

Refreshments will be served before the seminar.
Please contact Shauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu to RSVP.

 

Using Nanostructured Materials for Solar Energy Storage in Haiti

One of the key challenges facing the widespread use and commercialization of promising energy devices (i.e. fuel cells, batteries, organic solar cells etc.) is the high cost of the electrocatalytic and electrolyte materials and inefficiencies in their assembly and utilization. In this talk, I will present examples of how we are designing nanomaterials such as graphene-based carbons and bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys that can be incorporated into multifunctional composites for high performance nanostructured-enabled energy devices.

One of our missions is to create devices and systems that will renewably improve our way of life. In this context, I will describe our new initiative to develop a solar powered computer lab in Haiti that can be used by school children during the day and can function as an Internet café afterschool. We are seeking partners to leverage resources at Yale University and MIT to make this project a reality for the summer of 2016. This project resonates with solar battery research taking place in our lab and gives us motivation to implement strategies of getting our research out of the lab and into product based systems.

Coco Fusco presents “Dangerous Moves: Performance and Politics in Cuba” as part of the MIT Women’s and Gender Studies Intellectual Forum.

Introduction by Ed Schiappa, John E. Burchard Professor of the Humanities and Head of the MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing Program.

Thursday, March 12th  12 – 1:30 pm, The Chipman Room, 6-104

Lunch will be served, please RSVP to erneill@mit.edu and note dietary restrictions.

 

Dangerous Moves: Performance and Politics in Cuba is a study of the role of corporeal expressivity in development of social criticism in Cuban art. Fusco explores the work of performance artists from the 1980s to the present and examines how the Cuban state has wielded influence over performance through a combination of politics and practices that enable cultural production on the one hand and discipline public behavior on the other. The book will be published by Tate Publishing in the fall of 2015.

Kimani Toussaint presents at the first MIT MLK LUNCHEON SEMINAR of the Spring 2015 term.

Wednesday, February 18th  12 – 1:30 pm in the MIT Bush Room (10-105)

Refreshments will be served before the seminar.
Please contact Shauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu to RSVP.

 

Introduction to University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s PROBE Lab: From Optical Nanoantennas to Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy

The application of light to help solve problems in biology and nanotechnology has become increasingly popular because of the importance of these areas to society. This talk will highlight the major nano- and biophotonics projects pursued by the laboratory for Photonics Research of Bio/nano Environments (PROBE) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. We will discuss our recent studies on optical nanoantennas.

In particular, we show how the optical parameter space, along with the nanoantenna geometric properties can be tuned for a range of applications, including light-driven particle manipulation. We will also highlight some of our work in biological imaging using second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In this case, we review the quantitative SHG microscopy techniques pursued by the PROBE lab for quantifying collagen fiber organization in biological tissues. The talk will conclude with a brief discussion of some of the future work pursued by the PROBE lab and is aimed at a general audience.

Bio: Kimani C. Toussaint, Jr. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, and an Affiliate Faculty in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Bioengineering, as well as the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). Dr. Toussaint directs the laboratory for Photonics Research of Bio/nano Environments (PROBE Lab) at UIUC, an interdisciplinary research group which focuses on developing advanced optical techniques for both quantitatively imaging collagen-based biological structures, and investigating the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures for light-driven control of matter. Dr. Toussaint is a recipient of a 2010 NSF CAREER Award, and holds Senior Member positions in the OSA, IEEE, and SPIE.

He has previously been selected for both the National Academy of Science’s 18th Annual Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium, and the 8th Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative on Imaging Science. In addition, Dr. Toussaint has been on the UIUC List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students for 6 consecutive years due to his commitment to teaching. Dr.
Toussaint is currently on sabbatical at MIT as a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Annual MIT MLK Celebration Luncheon

Wednesday, February 4th from 11:00 AM-1 PM at Walker Memorial (Bldg. 50)

The MIT Community is invited to come to the 2015 Luncheon Celebration in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

This event is hosted by MIT President Rafael Reif.

James Mickens  presents at THE MLK VISITINGS SCHOLARS PROGRAM LUNCH SEMINAR SERIES 2014-2015

Wednesday, December 17th at 12-1:30 pm at Sloan E62-350

Refreshments will be served before the seminar.
Please contactShauna Bush-Fenty at sfenty@mit.edu with any questions.

Understanding Security Threats in Modern Web Browsers

Web browsers are the user-facing gateway to important online services like email, video streaming, e-commerce, and social networking. Unfortunately, as web browsers become more complex, their threat surface increases, making the browser (and the pages that it displays) attractive targets for cyber-criminals. This talk will describe some specific threats to web security, and introduce several technologies that make it easier for developers to create safe web applications. These technologies preserve the rich interactive nature of modern web pages, while providing developers with better abstractions for reasoning about security.

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