Tracing the Ancestry of Our Stars Thursday April 19th 11:45am – 1pm MIT Room W20-306 MLK Visiting Scholar Duane Lee, Physics Please register:  https://tinyurl.com/yb3pljxk The question about our ancestral origins has always been a preoccupation of humans beings. Today that question receives even greater attention as advancements in genomics have allowed us to map out the likely origins

Sonic/Scenes Symposium Saturday April 21st 9:30am – 5:30pm W20-307 (Mezzanine Lounge), Student Center Keynote speakers: Tina Campt & Roshini Kempadoo Organized by MLK Visiting Professor Kimberly Juanita Brown Please register: tinyurl.com/sonicscenes This symposium is the sixth iteration of a continuing conversation with and between members of the Dark Room: Race and Visual Culture Studies Seminar. The Dark Room is

  Kenda Mutongi’s Matatu: A History of Popular Transportation in Nairobi has been awarded the Hagley Prize in Business History for 2018.  The prize is for the best book in business history (broadly defined) and consists of a medallion and check for $2,500. Mutongi will be awarded at the annual Business History Conference dinner, on Saturday, April 7,

From The Bay State Banner, 1 March 2018 One of only a few African Americans to find success in classical music, violist [and MIT Institute Professor] Marcus Thompson has garnered critical acclaim since the start of his illustrious career. The South Bronx native earned the Juilliard School’s first-ever doctorate in viola performance, and in 1968, he performed

THE GENDER/RACE IMPERATIVE—A Series of Presentations and Workshops moderated by Anita Hill Wednesday February 28, 2018, 1–3PM Location: 36-462 & 36-428 https://whereis.mit.edu/?go=36 Open to the public, no registration required The Marginalization of Experience: African American Women in STEM Hosted by: Muriel Medard – Cecil H. Green Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, Research

Thursday, February 22 11:45am-1pm MIT Room W20-202 (La Sala de Puerto Rico) Abstract How do the public spaces we move in shape us and help determine the kind of people we want to become? We know more and more about the world around us, thanks to a deluge of data, but blind spots abound–too often,

MIT Black History Project launches new website

Digital archive features never-before-published image of MIT’s first black woman student Cambridge, MA – February 14, 2018– The MIT Black History Project has launched a new website that documents evidence of the role and experience of the black community at MIT since the Institute opened its doors in 1865. “Look at this project to get a better sense

Findings show founder William Barton Rogers possessed enslaved persons before coming to MIT; research, community dialogue to ensue. Peter Dizikes | MIT News Office February 12, 2018 MIT’s first president, William Barton Rogers, possessed enslaved persons in his Virginia household until the early 1850s, roughly a decade before he founded the Institute, according to new

Former NFL player Wade Davis gives keynote talk at annual event, reflects on his life as a gay black athlete. David L. Chandler | MIT News Office  February 9, 2018 When former NFL player Wade Davis, as a teenager, first told his mother that he was gay, he wasn’t prepared for the response he got: